Create Your Own Experiment

In class we have been practicing using the scientific method. You will put this knowledge to the test. You need to come up with your own idea for a simple (and inexpensive) experiment. Make sure that this is something that you can do safely at home. Then you need to complete the lab and write up all the steps of a formal lab report. You may complete this with a partner. 

Before you begin the experiment...

Turn in a sheet of paper with your experiment idea and it must be signed by a parent or guardian.  This activity can be worth up to 20 Extra Credit test points!!!

Good Luck!

Lab Write Up Guidelines
click here for a printable, pdf version

Title

The title can be as catchy or serious as you want, as long as it tells what the lab will be about.

Question or Problem Statement

- This is sometimes given to you.This question explains the purpose of the lab.
The first word is “To”
The second word is an action verb such as observe, test, record, measure, which is followed by “the affect of”

Variables

Independent Variable (IV) - Is what the experimenter is changing on purpose.
- Starts with “The independent variable, which will be changed and tested is…”
Dependent Variable (DV) - Is something that can be measured in numbers (unless teacher tells you otherwise).
Starts with “The dependent variable, which will be measured is…”

Control Group

- This is what everything else is being compared to.
- Starts with “The control is…”

Hypothesis

- The hypothesis is a prediction of what you think will happen based on what you already know.
- Starts with “If the (DV) is related to the (IV), then (prediction) .”

Materials

- Make a bulleted list of all the materials. Include the quantities.

Procedure

Make a numbered list of what is to be done in the experiment.
The steps should begin with action verbs (pour, measure, write, etc).
Make sure to include repeat trials.
Draw a diagram of the set up of the experiment.

Data Table/Observations

- Create a data table to display the results of the trials
- Include appropriate headings, units, and a title.
- The title should follow the format “The effect of (IV) on the (DV)”

Graph

- Choose an appropriate graph based on the type of data gathered- Include a title that matches the data table, labels for the x and y-axis, and all the units.

Results (paragraph form)

- Must have an introduction and a conclusion.
- Explain what happened.
- Summarize the data table (be specific).

Sources of Error

- Describe 3-5 human errors, environmental factors, or problems with materials that may have affected the results. Write as a sentence.

Conclusion (paragraph form)

1st sentence – state the purpose of the lab
2nd sentence – restate the hypothesis-
3rd sentence – state whether your hypothesis was correct or not
4th sentence – summarize the results of the data table -
5th sentence – explain how this lab helps you understand the world around you 

 


NASA Daily Image

NASA Image Of The Day
Hubble Sweeps a Messy Star Factory
This sprinkle of cosmic glitter is a blue compact dwarf galaxy known as Markarian 209. Galaxies of this type are blue-hued, compact in size, gas-rich, and low in heavy elements. They are often used by astronomers to study star formation, as their conditions are similar to those thought to exist in the early Universe. Markarian 209 in particular has been studied extensively. It is filled with diffuse gas and peppered with star-forming regions towards its core. This image captures it undergoing a particularly dramatic burst of star formation, visible as the lighter blue cloudy region towards the top right of the galaxy. This clump is filled with very young and hot newborn stars. This galaxy was initially thought to be a young galaxy undergoing its very first episode of star formation, but later research showed that Markarian 209 is actually very old, with an almost continuous history of forming new stars. It is thought to have never had a dormant period ? a period during which no stars were formed ? lasting longer than 100 million years. The dominant population of stars in Markarian 209 is still quite young, in stellar terms, with ages of under 3 million years. For comparison, the sun is some 4.6 billion years old, and is roughly halfway through its expected lifespan. The observations used to make this image were taken using Hubble?s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, and span the ultraviolet, visible, and infrared parts of the spectrum. A scattering of other bright galaxies can be seen across the frame, including the bright golden oval that could, due to a trick of perspective, be mistaken as part of Markarian 209 but is in fact a background galaxy. European Space Agency ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Nick Rose...
19 Dec 2014